Monday, March 16, 2015

Hang out your feeders--spring hummingbird migration is on!

Male black-chinned hummingbird.
For the last four years, our first Spring hummers flew in March 10th



Black-chinned males first, always. The guys want an early start to stake out territory. They know that the boys with the best turf get the girls.




We might have seen the front-runners a little earlier than other folks in our south-central Texas range because hummingbirds return to places they've found food in the past. 




Our feeders stayed out through the cold season, catering to over-wintering rufous hummers.

Rufous hummingbird.

And our gardens included hummingbird-habitat with early blooms such as native Coral honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens).



Black-chinned females follow later, usually by at least two weeks.



The feeders do more than offer a rest-stop; quick energy can be the difference between life and death for early arrivers encountering wet and cold.

Copyright 2009-2015 Kathleen Scott, for Hill Country Mysteries. Unauthorized reproduction is prohibited.

Thursday, March 12, 2015

Spaces: Beauty on a Budget

Fun accents in this room-- a pillow that pops, a coffee table made from an upside-down crate topped with a padded coffee bean sack, budget bling lamps from Target and a tableau of found art (centered by a favorite family picture) flanked by antique horns.

I love writing about unique homes and the people who create them. Some homes are elaborate and grand, others cozy and comfortable.  I learn from every one.

Cheryl Gordon's home was an eye-opener for making a 1950's place fresh and modern, on a budget. 

The photos here show a few ideas for inexpensive updates. For more, check out my Spaces story about Cheryl and her home, with nearly two dozen professional photos: Budget-minded beauty makes an aging home fresh .


A box made from old measuring sticks holds spirits.  And gives new meaning to the term 'open bar'.  

Copyright 2009-2015 Kathleen Scott, for Hill Country Mysteries. Unauthorized reproduction is prohibited.

Thursday, March 5, 2015

Bluebonnets Are Coming


Looks like this will be a blue-bonnet year. Sweeps of Lupinus texensis luring folks to the countryside; people celebrating floral sky on the ground and the beauty and promise of life.  Amen.


Copyright 2009-2015 Kathleen Scott, for Hill Country Mysteries. Unauthorized reproduction is prohibited.

Sunday, March 1, 2015

Fossil Rim Wildlife Center

There's a little bit of Africa at Fossil Rim Wildlife Center near Glen Rose, Texas, where visitors are confined to vehicles while approximately 1,000 animals roam free about the 1,800 acre property.

The wildlife center's mission is preservation of native and exotic species in peril, including Texas' endangered Attwater's Prairie Chicken.


  A visitor on a guided tour feeds an addax.

But the center is open to visitors for driving tours, one of the ways the mission is publicized and financed.  Although the animals are wild, many are acclimated to accept food, and visitors may hand-feed or toss food (sold at the entrance).


Three species of zebras live at Fossil Rim. 


I don't recommend feeding zebras by hand, although the scrapes on mine healed without incident.




Ostrich are another species known for aggressive table manners. 



The aodad's horns look fierce but the horizontal pupils in this mountain sheep's russet-colored eyes make you want to stare into them.


A herd of giraffes sometimes hangs out in view of the Oasis diner, the (fenced-in) lunch and bathroom facility located about mid-way through the 9.5 mile scenic drive.  



When you roll down your window and a giraffe approaches, he stops about a bedroom's length away from the car, because that's how long his neck is. 

You hold out your hand and his head begins a slow descent, giving you time to realize just how big it is, how many teeth he has and how strong a bite it must take to eat leaves and shoots from trees. Then he brushes your palm with soft whiskery lips, inhaling the kibble in a tickle.



Folks who want to wake up with the wildlife may reserve a tent in a safari-like encampment (fenced in). The tents are actually more like tiny cabins, with AC, heat and private bathrooms complete with hot and cold running water, shower and flush toilet.  

For rustic luxury, the original ranch house is a B&B with more traditional accommodations. 

Advance reservations suggested for both.

Fossil Rim Wildlife Center
www.fossilrim.org, 254.897.2960, 
Park address:  2299 County Road 2008, Glen Rose, Texas 76043
Safari camp, Lodge address: 3002 County Road 2010, Glen Rose, Texas 76043

Take your sweetheart, kids or grandkids...and enjoy a little Africa in Texas.

Copyright 2009-2015 Kathleen Scott, for Hill Country Mysteries. Unauthorized reproduction is prohibited.