Wednesday, February 4, 2015

Hope Springs

Comal headwater spring flowing from the base of a hill, May 2008.

About 18 months ago, the gushing spring at the head of New Braunfels' Comal River went dry from continuing drought; first time since the 1950's. Broke the hearts of townsfolk who grew up courting on the springside benches made by the Civilian Conservation Corps during the Great Depression.

Water issues from more than 100 springs in Landa Lake, a protected waterway in Landa Park where the Comal River begins.

Thankfully, other springs continued and the river continued to flow, albeit low and slow.

Last November rain began to fall, about once every two weeks. Generally not a lot at a time but enough to nourish the land.  And the underground waters of the Edwards Aquifer, the waters that feed the springs, began to rise. 

Last month, water began to issue from the headwater spring again. It's a soft flow, but enough to wash away the fire ant nest that had risen at the mouth.  Enough for hope.

  Wood ducks winter in Landa Park, swimming in the Comal River. 

Copyright 2009-2015 Kathleen Scott, for Hill Country Mysteries. Unauthorized reproduction is prohibited.

4 comments :

dryheatblog said...

Very nice to see the water is flowing some; I remember seeing that spring with you, with little water (need to check my pics).

TexasDeb said...

Phew! I'm relieved this has a hopeful if not a happy ending (for now). That fire ant nest seems an apt object lesson doesn't it? Misuse your water and all you'll end up with are angry imported stinging ants instead! I was frustrated recently because wet days are keeping me from getting work done outdoors but now I'll just sit back and try to be more appreciative of what the aquifer needs for a change. Come on, rain!

Debra said...

That's so nice your water levels are up. In Austin we are probably going to Stage 3 water restrictions. Love the photos.

Dorothy Borders said...

It's been a fairly wet winter so far where we live in Southeast Texas. We can only hope that it continues and becomes more widespread to replenish those aquifers. Texas certainly needs it.